The History of the
Royal Regiment of Fusiliers
1968 till Present


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The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers inherited a unique history and set of traditions from its four former regiments

ORIGINS

The Fusiliers take their title from the time of King James II in 1685 when he ordered Lord Dartmouth to form an Ordnance Regiment to guard the artillery. He called them my Royal Regiment of Fuzileers and had them armed with the Fusil, the most up to date weapon of the day. The Regiment became the 7th of Foot, the Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) and other infantry regiments subsequently became Fusiliers, the most famous of which, the royal Northumberland (5th of Foot), Lancashire (XX of Foot) and in the 1960s the Royal Warwickshire (6th of Foot) together with the Royal Fusiliers formed the Royal Regiment of Fusilier in 1968 (England's Finest)
HISTORY

The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers inherited a unique history and set of traditions from its four former regiments.
Each former regiment has an exceptional place in military history, from the Northumberland Fusiliers winning of the Hackle at the battle of St Lucia, to the Lancashire Fusiliers winning 6 Victoria Crosses at Gallipoli. The Royal Warwickshire's led the way on D-Day while the Royal Fusiliers counter attack at Albuhera in 1813 undoubtedly saved Wellingtons campaign in Spain against Napoleon.
All four regiments fought in WW1, raised 196 battalions between them and were represented in every major campaign. In WWII all four regiments took part in some of the most incredible operations of that period, from the Lancashire Fusiliers operating as Chindits against the Japanese in Burma to the Royal Warwickshire's D-Day landing and the Royal Northumberland and Royal Fusiliers fighting in North Africa and Italy.
After WWII the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers and Royal Fusiliers fought in Korea and all four regiments saw service in one of the many trouble spots around the world from Malaya to Kenya.
Since 1968 and the Regiments formation, Fusiliers have seen service across the world and found themselves at the sharp end in countries as diverse as Northern Ireland and Cyprus, More recently the Regiment served in the Balkans and took part in the first and second Gulf wars.
Today, Fusiliers both Regular and TA have served from Iraq to Afghanistan and are ready for deployment anytime, anywhere.

FORMATION

The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers was formed on April 23rd 1968, as part of the reforms of the army that saw the creation of the first 'large infantry regiment', with the amalgamation of the four English fusilier regiments these were,

The Royal Northumberland Fusiliers
The Royal Warwickshire Fusiliers
The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment)
The Lancashire Fusiliers


THE REGIMENTAL AND TRADITIONAL DAYS
Regimental Day.
St Georges Day 23 April (All ranks wear red and white roses in their headdress)
Apart from the Regimental Day the days shown below are often observed since they were traditional days of the former Regiments.
Traditional Days.
Gallipoli Day 25 April
Albuhera Day 16 May
Normandy Day 6 June
Minden Day 1 August (All ranks wear rose and primrose roses in their headdress)



THE HACKLE
The distinctive red and white Hackle, worn by all ranks in the Regiment, was handed down from the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers. The Hackle was awarded in recognition for the defeat of the French at the Battle of St Lucia in 1778. The white hackles were removed from the French dead by the Fusiliers. In 1829 King George IV ordered the white plume to be worn by all line infantry regiments, and in order not to take away from the Fifth (Northumberland) Regiment of Foot's battle honour, their plume was distinguished with a red tip making the plume red over white

Today
The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers currently have one regular Battalions and one Territorial Battalion:
The First Fusiliers are now based in Mooltan Barracks Tidworth.
The 5th (V) Battalion Territorial Army in Durham, Newcastle and Ashington



The Royal Northumberland Fusiliers was one of England’s premier county regiments and can trace its ancestry back to the year 1674.When first raised it was part of the Dutch Service and known as the Irish Regiment, or Viscount Clare’s Regiment. Until 1751, like most other regiments, it was known successively by the names of the colonels who commanded them at the time. The Regiment was transferred to the British Service in 1689. From 5 June 1685 its order of precedence was the 5th Regiment of the Line. It was not until 1 July 1751 that it was designated by that number as the "5th Regiment of Foot" when the system of naming regiments after their Colonels was dropped. As a fusilier regiment, it wears a hackle, which in this case is red over white. This distinction was originally a white plume which His Majesty’s Fifth Regiment of Foot had taken from the head dress of fallen French troops at St. Lucia in December 1778. The Fifth Regiment of Foot became His Majesty’s Fifth (Northumberland) Regiment of Foot with the county affiliations of 1782. In 1829 King George IV ordered the white plume to be worn by all infantry regiments, and in order not to take away from the Fifth (Northumberland) Regiment of Foot’s battle honour, their plume was distinguished by being made red over white. This came from the legend that the men of the Fifth ( Northumberland) Regiment of Foot dipped the white plumes in the blood of the French at St. Lucia.

On 4 May 1836 it became a fusilier regiment and was redesignated as the 5th (Northumberland Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot. With the Cardwell reforms of 1881, the regiment was linked with the county on 1 July 1881, as the Northumberland Fusiliers with the general loss of numbering.

Regular battalions continued for many years afterwards to refer to themselves as the "Fifth Fusiliers" unofficially .On 3 June 1935, the regiment was given the prefix "Royal". With the British Army reforms of the late 1960s forming large regiments, it was merged with other regiments and became the 1st Battalion of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers on St George’s Day, 23 April 1968.

To this day, the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers continues to wear some of the insignia of the four county regiments from which it was formed and to honour their traditions and carry their battle honours.

Battles

1808 - Rolica ( Peninsular War)
1808 - Vimiero ( Peninsular War)
1809 - Corunna ( Peninsular War)
1810 - Busaco ( Peninsular War)
1812 - Salamanca ( Peninsular War)
1812 - Badajoz ( Peninsular War)
1812 - Ciudad Rodrigo ( Peninsular War)
1813 - Vittoria ( Peninsular War)
1813 - Nivelle ( Peninsular War)
1814 - Orthes ( Peninsular War)
1814 - Toulouse ( Peninsular War)
1858 - Relief of Lucknow ( Indian Mutiny)
1878 - Afghanistan
1900 - South Africa
1914 - Mons ( WW1)
1914 - Marne ( WW1)
1914 - Ypres ( WW1)
1914 - 1st World War
1916 - Somme ( WW1)
1918 - Somme ( WW1)
1945 - 2nd World War ( WW2)
1950 - Korean War



The Royal Warwickshire Regiment was an infantry regiment of the British Army. It was first formed in the 17th century under the name the 6th Regiment of Foot. In 1873, they received the title the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

The regiment became involved in a number of notable campaigns. These included the Battle of the Boyne in 1690, the War of the Spanish Succession, the Napoleonic Wars, the Boer Wars, the two World Wars and the Korean War.

In 1963, they became the Royal Warwickshire Fusiliers and in 1968 were amalgamated with other battalions to become the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers.

Battles

1690 - Boyne ( Glorious Revolution)
1691 - Athlone ( Glorious Revolution)
1710 - Almenara ( War of the Spanish Succession)
1710 - Saragossa ( War of the Spanish Succession)
1710 - Brihuega ( War of the Spanish Succession)
1808 - Peninsular War
1891 - Boer War
1899 - 2nd Boer War
1914 - 1st World War
1945 - 2nd World War ( WW2)
1950 - Korean War



The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) was an infantry regiment of the Britsh Army. It was first formed in 1685 under the name The Ordnance Regiment. It was later renamed to the 7th Regiment of Foot and in 1881 became known as The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment).

During its three hundred years of service, the regiment became involved in several campaigns. These included the American and French Revolutions, the Napoleonic Wars, and the two World Wars in the twentieth century.

In April 1968, it was amalgamated with the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers, the Royal Warwickshire Fusiliers and the Lancashire Fusiliers to form The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers.

Battles

1778 - Monmouth ( War of American Independence)
1780 - Charleston ( War of American Independence)
1811 - Albuera ( Peninsular War)
1914 - 1st World War
1945 - 2nd World War ( WW2)



The XX Lancashire Fusiliers were first formed in Devon in 1688 and given the name Peyton’s Regiment of Foot. In 1782, it became the East Devonshire Regiment and in 1881, it was renamed to The Lancashire Fusiliers.

During the early years, the regiment served during the Battle of the Boyne, the War of the Spanish Succession and the Seven Years War. During the First World War, it raised thirty battalions and represented every campaign. The regiment also raised seventeen battalions during the Second World War.

In 1968, it amalgamated with other Fusilier regiments in the British Army to form the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers.

Battles

1690 - Boyne ( Glorious Revolution)
1691 - Aughrim ( Glorious Revolution)
1702 - Vigo Bay ( War of the Spanish Succession)
1743 - Dettingen ( War of the Austrian Succession)
1745 - Fontenoy ( War of the Austrian Succession)
1746 - Culloden ( Jacobite Rebellion)
1759 - Minden ( Seven Years War)
1914 - 1st World War
1939 - 45 2nd World War ( WW2 )